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The News Hole

Dime Museum Death Watch

www.dimemuseum.net

Posted 2/22/2006

In November 2003, The Sun reported that Baltimore’s American Dime Museum was closing up shop, but the one of the museum’s partners, Dick Horne, changed his mind and decided to keep it alive for a little longer. In November 2005, the Dime Museum announced once again that it would be closing. But according to a message on the Dime Museum’s web site, www.dimemuseum.net, and a press release sent to the media last week, Horne is resurrecting the place once again:

“In response to the outpouring of encouragement to pursue further efforts to keep the American Dime Museum open and in Baltimore, the museum has decided that, for now, we will keep the collection intact, and, as of March 15th, open to the public group tours by appointment, small parties, and other scheduled events. For more information . . . Thank you, Dick Horne”

 

 


Because Smoking Is Bad For You?


The City Paper Digi-Cam™

Can someone please investigate why Fader’s tobacco shop has been closed for over three weeks now? The place is a Baltimore institution.

Thank You,

Mark Strand
Baltimore

The Original Fader’s tobacconist at 12 S. Calvert St. has been closed since mid-January, according to attorney William Buie, who rents office space above the downtown shop. Several handwritten signs in the windows announce closed, with no further information. Multiple attempts to reach owner Donald Sarp and the building’s property manager were unsuccessful, though Buie says the management company has told him that Sarp was behind on his rent, and that the first-floor space is now on the market for $6,000 a month. The tobacco shop’s apparent demise ends more than 110 years of a Fader’s in downtown Baltimore (other Fader’s-branded shops are still operated by different owners in Towson, Catonsville, Owings Mills, and Annapolis). The first Fader’s tobacco store was opened on East Baltimore Street in 1891 by Abraham Fader. After three generations of running it, the Fader family sold the business in 1998. “It’s definitely a shame,” says Buie, an avid cigar smoker and second-generation Fader’s customer. “They’ve been downtown so long.”


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