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Black-Booked

The Black Guerrilla Family prison gang sought legitimacy, but got indictments

Black Guerrilla Family indictees (clockwise from top left) Avon Freeman, Darien Scipio, Darryl Taylor, Deitra Davenport, Marlow Bates, Nelson Robinson, Randolph Edison, Roosevelt Drummond, Ray Olivis, and Zachary Norman

By Van Smith | Posted 8/5/2009

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Glimpses of Brown's leadership style are documented in the criminal evidence against him, including a conference call last Nov. 18 between Brown and two other inmates, "Comrade Doc" and Thomas Bailey, each on the line from different prisons.

"Listen, man, we [are] on the verge of big things," Brown said, and Bailey assured him that "whatever you need me to do, man, I'm there." "This positive movement that we are embarking upon now . . . is moving at a rapid pace," Brown continued, and is "happening on almost every location." He exhorted Bailey with a slogan, "Revolution is the only solution, brother," and promised to send copies of his book, explaining how to use it as a classroom study guide.

The Black Book is a self-described "changing life styles living policy book" intended to help inmates, ex-cons, and their families navigate life successfully ("The Black Book," Mobtown Beat, May 27). Its ideological basis is rooted in the 1960s radical politics of BGF founder George Jackson, the inmate revolutionary in California who, until his death in 1971, pitched the same self-sufficient economic and social separatism that The Black Book preaches. Throughout, despite rhetorical calls for defiance against perceived oppression and injustice, it promotes what appears to be lawful behavior--with the notable exception of domestic abuse, given its instructions that the husband of a disobedient wife should "beat her lightly."

The BGF is not mentioned by name in The Black Book, which instead refers to "The Family" (or "Jamaa," the Swahili equivalent), explaining that it is not a "gang" but an "organization." The back cover features printed kudos from local educators, including two-time Democratic candidate for Baltimore mayor Andrey Bundley, now a high-ranking Baltimore City public-schools official in charge of alternative-education programs. His blurb praises Brown for "not accepting the unhealthy traditions of street organizations aka gangs" and for trying "to guide his comrades toward truth, justice, freedom, and equality."

Tyrone Powers, director of the Anne Arundel Community College's Homeland Security and Criminal Justice Institute, and a former FBI agent, offers back-cover praise for The Black Book, describing it as an "extraordinary volume" and calling Brown and his co-authors "extraordinary insightful men and leaders."

Powers says in a phone interview that he knows Brown "by going into the prison system as part of an effort to deal with three or four different gangs." Powers is "totally unapologetic" about endorsing The Black Book.

"The gang problem is increasing," Powers explains, "and we need to have direct contact with the people involved, or who have been involved. We need to be bringing the gang members together and tell them there's no win in that, except for prison or the cemetery. Gang members can be influential in anti-gang efforts, and we have got to utilize them. Are we calling them saints? No, we are not. My objective is to reduce the violence, and I don't think sterile academic programs work as well as engaging some of our young people, like Eric, as part of a program."

In early May, nearly a month after Brown was indicted, Bundley explained his ties to the inmate to The Baltimore Sun. "I've seen [rival gangs] come together in one room and work on the lessons in The Black Book to get themselves together," he was quoted as saying. "I know Eric Brown was a major player inside the prison doing that work. The quote on the back of the book is only about the work that I witnessed: no more, no less."

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Tags: shadow economy, black guerilla family

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