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Mobtown Beat

Direct Connections

Evidence mounts that foreign sources, including the Los Zetas cartel, deal directly with Baltimore traffickers

the symbol of the los zetas cartel

By Van Smith | Posted 3/3/2010

"The goal of any drug dealer is to cut out as many middle men as possible in order to increase profits."

That statement was made by Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein a year ago, when he unveiled Operation Xcellerator, a U.S. Justice Department initiative aimed at laying low the long reach of the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico. "I do believe," he said at the time, "there are Baltimore drug dealers who do this by having connections with drug distributors outside of the U.S." He vowed to "continue to trace the drugs back to the source, work our way to the top, and ultimately indict the major players."

Since then, law enforcers here have successfully ferreted out some international ties to Baltimore's entrenched drug economy. Though Rosenstein's office points to only one Xcellerator case in Baltimore--a conspiracy with ties to Hollywood and Baltimore City Hall ("Mexican Connection," Mobtown Beat, March 4, 2009)--City Paper has found three recent examples of evidence filed in U.S. District Court that indicate direct ties between Baltimore and foreign sources of supply, including the fearsome Los Zetas cartel in Mexico.

The Los Zetas connection arose on Feb. 17, when a superseding indictment was filed in a conspiracy case involving 44-year-old Jamaica-born Baltimorean Wade Coats ("Armed Drug Dealer for Steele?" Mobtown Beat, June 17, 2009). Coats and his co-defendants--43-year-old Ronald Brown of Baltimore and 42-year-old Jos? Cavazos of Midlothian, Texas--were snared by law enforcers last April, when Coats and Cavazos used a room at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront hotel to conduct an alleged high-dollar cocaine and heroin deal. The superseding indictment names a fourth defendant, 38-year-old Baltimorean James Bostic, whose presence in the case added evidence of dealings with Los Zetas.

Prior to the superseding indictment, the government's case seemed tenuous, since the Baltimore police detective who swore out the initial complaints in the case--Mark James Lunsford--has since been charged federally with lying and embezzlement ("Costly Charges," Mobtown Beat, Nov. 11, 2009).

Investigators learned of Bostic's alleged acts involving Los Zetas in December, according to court documents, when a confidential source said that Bostic "would be making a large cash payment to a representative of the Los Zetas Mexican Drug Cartel for previously obtained cocaine and marijuana on December 29, 2009 at the Marriott Residence Inn in White Marsh."

After receiving the information, the documents say, investigators "pre-wired a room for audio and visual recording" at the hotel. Bostic arrived at the appointed time, allegedly carrying a suitcase containing $590,000, which he gave to cartel representatives at the meeting. The documents say he complained to them about "the poor quality of the marijuana he had received and asked when he could expect his next shipment of cocaine." Cartel representatives then allegedly counted the money, placed it in heat-sealed bags, and hid it in a Ford Explorer. According to the documents, as the cartel representatives were leaving the state the next day, "a vehicle stop was conducted of the Ford Explorer," and the same amount of money Bostic had turned over was recovered.

The investigation continued on Feb. 2, according to the documents, when the confidential source told law enforcers "that a multi-kilogram drug transaction" involving Bostic and a cartel representative was about to occur at the same White Marsh Marriott. The investigators again pre-wired the room. Bostic and a cartel representative met and "the representative produced a suitcase." Bostic opened it, "began counting kilograms of cocaine," then left with the suitcase. After a short foot chase in the hotel's parking lot, Bostic was arrested and "recovered from his person was a large hunting style knife and a large sum of U.S. currency." The suitcase, which Bostic had dropped when the chase began, contained approximately 12 kilograms of cocaine.

The court documents do not say what became of the Los Zetas representatives who met with Bostic. According to the Justice Department's 2008 National Drug Threat Assessment, Los Zetas is "the enforcement arm of the Gulf Cartel" and some of its members are former Mexican Special Forces soldiers who "maintain expertise in the use of heavy weaponry, specialized military tactics, sophisticated communications equipment, intelligence collection, and counter surveillance techniques." More recently, according a 2009 U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) press release, Los Zetas has "evolved into not only a security force but a drug trafficking organization in their own right," merging with the Gulf Cartel to become a powerful entity known as "The Company."

None of the attorneys representing defendants in the Coats case would comment for this article, since it involves an ongoing matter.

Another recent federal drug case involving Baltimore and Mexico nabbed Santiago Vargas-Ponce, who was charged Feb. 17. The case against him, like the one against Bostic, was built on information provided by a confidential source, followed by recorded surveillance. That source, according to court documents, was "in negotiations" in January with "a Mexican drug-trafficker . . . to deliver a large quantity of cocaine to Baltimore."

Vargas-Ponce, the court documents say, arrived in Baltimore on Feb. 15 with a drug-laden vehicle, met with the confidential source, and arranged to do the drug deal the next day. After the source picked Vargas-Ponce up at a hotel and "gathered tools to extract the cocaine from the vehicle," the two headed to "a secured garage located in Owings Mills," which investigators had equipped with a hidden camera. Once the source dropped Vargas-Ponce off at the garage and left the area to go get money, agents watched Vargas-Ponce "disassemble the vehicle" and "extract a large object from the engine compartment." The agents then arrested Vargas-Ponce and proceeded to discover another object in the engine compartment. In all, the two objects held approximately six kilograms of cocaine, the court documents say. Vargas-Ponce's attorney from the federal public-defender's office, who was appointed on Feb. 24, did not wish to comment for this story.

The third recent case is a Nov. 2009 DEA search warrant for two Baltimore storage lockers leased by a Baltimore man named Paul Sessomes. The warrant relates DEA intelligence-gathering by its offices in New York and Bogot?, Colombia, dating to 2008, and names recently convicted drug-dealer Thomas Corey Crosby, who in turn was tied to (but not charged in) a 2007 federal case involving convicted drug conspirators who used Fat Cats Variety store in Southwest Baltimore ("All the Emperor's Men," Mobtown Beat, Aug. 27, 2008).

The November search warrant turned up $535,200 in cash stuffed in a large dufflebag, and mortgage documents in Sessomes' name. The items were retrieved from a Public Storage locker near Security Square Mall. The affidavit supporting the warrant describes how Sessomes used a cell-phone to discuss "the delivery of drug proceeds" with targets of a DEA heroin-trafficking-and-money-laundering investigation conducted by DEA New York and DEA Bogota. "In fact," the affidavit states, "during September 2008, Paul Sessomes was observed by the agents meeting with Diego Neira and Maria Espitia-Garcia, known money launderers for the Bogot?, Colombia based Espitia heroin organization under investigation, in Baltimore."

Public records show that Sessomes has a used-auto dealership, Westport Auto, and owns real estate in the area, including a house in Columbia and a condominium at 414 Water St. in downtown Baltimore. State court records show that Westport Auto has been a defendant in four Baltimore City forfeiture cases brought by Rudolph Drayton of the Baltimore City State's Attorney's Office since 2005. Co-defendants in each of the cases were charged or convicted drug dealers.

Sessomes' attorney, James Gitomer, says he doesn't "have anything to say about" the search warrant, but points out that Sessomes has not been charged with a crime and that "there has never been a claim made for that money" seized from the storage locker leased by his client, suggesting that it might not belong to Sessomes.

The three recent instances of alleged direct Baltimore ties to foreign drug-world suppliers suggest that Rosenstein's office, even after prosecuting the Sinaloa-tied Xcellerator case, is still finding that some Mobtown dealers are indeed able to cut out the middle-men in the global drug game and go straight to source.

Thomas Corey Crosby Forfeiture Affidavit Paul Sessomes' Locker Warrant James Bostic Complaint Santiago Vargas-Ponce Complaint

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