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Comic Relief

Posted 5/9/2001

Just wanted to say "kudos" to the people who write the online column Funny Paper. I enjoyed it all the way out here on the Left Coast. It's great stuff and relevant too, because it turns out (who woulda thunk it?) that you guys get pretty much the same comics we do! Gosh, and here I thought Cathy Guisewite was writing just for me. Crosswords too: A clue from one of last week's puzzles was "two-toned snack." Clever, huh?

Anyway, kudos. There, I said it.

Eric Rapp
Los Angeles

Birthright and Wrong
While Barbara Harris' novel approach to dealing with the skyrocketing birthrate among the drug-addicted is unconventional, controversial, and probably merits some rethinking, it is at least a beginning (Mobtown Beat, April 18). This problem is currently being addressed in an ineffective manner, with methods that are outdated and statistically illogical to use. Ms. Harris is simply doing what many Americans feel is the right thing to do. However, they also feel the social stigma against such an idea is simply too great.

Sten Witzel
Baltimore

Hall's Confederacy
I'm a little bit amazed at all the anti-Wiley Hall III letters I see in City Paper. Hall also has a column in the Afro-American, where the readers seem OK with him.

I read Hall's columns in both papers and more often than not find his writing refreshingly thought-provoking, even insightful. Perhaps some folks can't take their thoughts being provoked!

I'm reminded of Jonathan Swift's observation that "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him."

No, I don't consider Hall a "genius." It's just that, compared to the level of "logic" most of his critics level against him, he could pass for one.

A. Robert Kaufman
Baltimore

Corrections: Last week's cover story incorrectly reported that Edie Catto was the only local professional actor in the film Two Unknown Photographers. Richard Kirstel, a Baltimore boards mainstay who has performed at Center Stage, the Spotlighters, and other venues, also appeared in the film.

Speaking of artistic oversight, the pictures accompanying two Critic's Choice items in last week's Baltimore Weekly calendar were accidentally transposed. Lois Borgenicht's "Still Life With Copper Compote" should have appeared on Page 56, Leon Kalas' "Madam Fifi" on Page 58. Borgenicht's exhibit at Resurgam Gallery is still up and running, and we highly recommend you go see it, even without Madam Fifi.

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