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Mobtown Beat

New York Boys

A Queens Gangster and His Attorney Visit Baltimore

By Van Smith | Posted 6/4/2003

Kenneth "Supreme" McGriff, notorious for his ruthless endeavors in the 1980s as leader of a $10-million-a-year drug organization that fueled a crack epidemic in public-housing high rises in Jamaica, Queens, came to Baltimore federal court June 2 for sentencing on firearms charges. McGriff, an ex-con, was arrested in Miami on Dec. 28 for possessing firearms, in violation of federal law, during repeated visits to a Glen Burnie shooting range.

McGriff is a movie producer now, with a new straight-to-DVD gangster movie out, Crime Partners, based on a Donald Goines novel and featuring Hollywood stars Snoop Dogg and Ice-T. And he was recently revealed as the behind-the-scenes money and muscle of Grammy Award-winning hip-hop record label Murder Inc.

U.S. District Court Judge Frederick Motz, who is presiding over McGriff's Baltimore gun case, has seen his share of high-profile defendants over the decades, but a Big Apple movie-and-music mogul in a Baltimore courtroom is a very rare bird.

Watching McGriff's back in court was Manhattan lawyer Robert Simels, a veteran of nearly a quarter-century of famed defendants--from Italian mobsters and drug lords from the 'hood, to international bankers and Russian gasoline bootleggers. Among his clients have been a few well-known Baltimoreans with New York connections. Kenneth Antonio "Bird" Jackson, the politically connected former lieutenant of Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams' heroin hierarchy of the 1980s, has used Simels to fight everything from tax-evasion charges to city liquor-board infractions. Simels represented William "Little Will" Franklin--a drug trafficker who in 1987 was indicted with Phillip A. "Phil Boy" Murray, owner of O'Dell's nightclub on North Avenue, on drug charges--when he faced new drug-dealing charges in the late '90s. Antonio "Big Black" Howell, former head of the East Baltimore gang the Nickel Boys, also turned to Simels when the feds closed in on his outfit.

McGriff, on the other hand, is a New Yorker with Baltimore connections--and the little that is publicly known about those connections suggests that Simels is going to have his hands full defending McGriff.

McGriff--who is known to use two other names, "Ricky Coleman" and "Lee Tuten"--pleaded guilty in April to gun charges stemming from his repeated use of firearms at Select-Fire shooting range next to the Glen Burnie Mall off of Ritchie Highway between January 1999 and June 2001.

Federal convicts like McGriff, who was sentenced to a lengthy prison term after his exploits in the Queens, N.Y., high rises, aren't legally allowed to possess firearms or ammunition, yet a certificate from Select-Fire contained in court files reflects that, in August 2000, McGriff completed a "tactical handgun training course" with a "L.E. [law enforcement] Firearms Instructor" whose signature is illegible. The New York federal prosecutor, Tracy Lee Dalton, who was deputized in Baltimore to handle the case after McGriff's December arrest in Miami, also asserts in a May 28 sentencing memorandum that "on a number of occasions the defendant utilized machine guns" at Select-Fire.

A recent City Paper visit to Select-Fire elicited a shocked reaction from owner Wayne Nowicki. "Where did you get this?" he asked when presented with a copy of McGriff's training certificate from his establishment. When told it was from the federal courthouse, he exclaimed, "Got my balls up my asshole," and asked the reporter to leave his shop.

Select-Fire is one of two Baltimore-area locations where prosecutor Dayton places McGriff. The other is a residence in the Red Run Apartments complex in Owings Mills, where two men from New York were gunned down in the parking lot on Aug. 20, 2001. Inside the apartment investigators found McGriff's fingerprints as well as the Select-Fire certificate, "numerous items related to [Crime Partners]," a stolen handgun, about $30,000 in cash, and "a large quantity" of cocaine and heroin.

The official line on the Red Run double murder, which remains unsolved, is simply that it appears to be drug-related. Four months earlier, one of the Red Run victims, Karon Russell Clarrett, had been nabbed on Interstate 95 in Robeson County, N.C., with 2.3 kilograms of cocaine.

Federal authorities in New York have linked McGriff to violence in recent years, though he hasn't been charged with any related crimes. "In one instance, McGriff directed co-conspirators to kill a drug associate who, agents believe, McGriff suspected of cooperating with the government," according to an Internal Revenue Service affidavit, quoted in the May 17 Sun, filed May 12 in a New York federal forfeiture suit filed against McGriff's assets. "In another instance, McGriff was involved with the shooting of another rap artist named 50 Cent." The performer in question, 50 Cent, has been at the vortex of hip-hop-world violence: He's been shot on two occasions and has made a name in part on his resulting street credibility.

At McGriff's June 2 hearing, Judge Motz handed him a 37-month sentence, to be served consecutively with whatever term he receives for another gun charge pending in New York.

"There is absolutely no excuse for you to be anywhere near a firearm," Motz admonished McGriff, concluding that the only reason for the defendant's gunplay at Select-Fire was "to keep your skills up, and that says it all. Felons have no reason to keep their [gun] skills up."

Before the hearing, Simels bantered with the press.

"It shouldn't even be in violation of federal laws [for a felon] to be at a firing range," he insisted. When he went before Motz, however, Simels changed his tune, pleading with the judge for a lighter sentence, acknowledging, "It was wrong for [McGriff] to go."

"This is a lot of attention for a little case," Simels remarked to the courthouse press corps. But the widespread attention to McGriff's misdeeds in Baltimore is due to his newly publicized stature as a player in the rap world.

Since last December, when the New York Daily News first reported that a U.S. Attorney's Office in Brooklyn was zeroing in on McGriff and Crime Partners, McGriff's role in Murder, Inc. has taken shape in the press in drips and drabs. The probe, begun in 2000, is prying into alleged financial ties between the drug world and the rap industry.

The federal forfeiture suit filed on May 12 in New York against McGriff's movie company, Picture Perfect, alleges that since 1999 McGriff has been laundering drug money, including profits from his Baltimore operations, through the Crime Partners project. Murder Inc. promoted the movie while Def Jam Records produced the film's soundtrack, according to the suit.

Other entertainment-industry players crop up in the complaint, including Raven Knite Productions of Los Angeles, which is said in the suit to be Crime Partners' agent. The company's roots are in producing 1990s music videos, including ones for Marion "Suge" Knight's Death Row Records. It currently gets decent work on the Hollywood periphery. In 2001, for instance, Raven Knite snagged a production credit for Queens-based Transcontinental Records' jump into the movie world, Long Shot, a movie that AllPop.com describes as "a teen comedy with cameos from Britney Spears, Lance from *NSync, KC [of the Sunshine Band], and Kenny Rogers."

"In or about 2001," the IRS forfeiture suit alleges, a package to Raven Knite was intercepted by authorities after it had caught the attention of drug-sniffing dogs. The package was from one of Crime Partners' co-producers, Jon Ragin of New York, a man with a criminal history in the drug business who currently is facing credit-card fraud charges in connection with the Murder Inc. investigation. Inside was $5,000 in cash, wrapped in scented baby wipes--a tactic, the complaint alleges, that is frequently used by narcotics traffickers "to disguise the tell-tale scent of their narcotics proceeds."

Attempts to reach Raven Knite for comment were unsuccessful. The company's listed Los Angeles telephone number has been disconnected.

With the federal investigation of McGriff and Murder Inc. heading into courtrooms, Simels is handling spin control as the feds' version of events seeps out of the court files and into press coverage. Simels has said repeatedly that while McGriff has an ugly past in the drug business, his present moneymaking endeavors in the entertainment industry are entirely legitimate.

And profitable, by all appearances. After McGriff's Dec. 28 arrest in Miami on the Baltimore gun charges, a magistrate judge concluded that McGriff should be kept in detention because he presented a flight risk, in part because his billfold is fat. In addition to the small amounts of ecstasy and heroin found in McGriff's wallet when he was arrested in a Miami hotel, the judge proclaimed that McGriff "has extensive financial resources." Presumably, then, he can afford Simels' pricey legal services--unlike some of Simels' past clients, like Good Fellas mobster Henry Hill and New York Jets football player Ken O'Brien, both of whom Simels sued for failure to pay their bills.

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Tags: shadow economy

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